As lots of people have started cooking more at home, the thirst for new recipes is on. Yet, what most people don’t realize is that old cookbooks are filled with fantastic recipes that our grand parents and great grand parents grew up eating. When it comes to the main meal of the day, vegetables were not in abundance. Unless one lived on a farm, the western diet was primarily starch and meat. Bread, potatoes, beef, mutton, and pork were the daily fare.

Desserts played a major part in the lives of our distant relatives, and puddings were the most popular. Made with suet, the fatty tissue that covers mutton and beef organs, these puddings were primarily steamed and served with a sauce or home made ice-cream.

This fabulous recipe dates to the late 1800s. All of the ingredients can be prepared the day before, except the beating of the eggs. It will serve a large gathering. For less, adjust the quantities.

Ingredients

8 eggs
2 pts milk
1lb stale bread (or 1/2lb bread and 1/2lb flour)
1 lb sugar
1 lb suet (or 1 lb unsalted butter)
1 lb currants
1 lb raisins
Grated fresh nutmeg
Cinnamon
Mace
Grated rind of lemon or orange
1 gls brandy
1 glass wine
Dash salt

Method
Beat eight eggs very lightly; add a pint of milk and beat; gradually stir in a pound of stale grated bread. If you don’t have a pound of stale bread, use ½ lb of bread and ½ lb of flour. Slowly add a pound of sugar. Slowly, and alternately, add 1 lb suet (or 1 lb unsalted butter) 1 lb currants and 1 lb raisins. The fruit must be well sprinkled with flour to prevent its sinking to the bottom. Stir the mixture smartly. In the last place, add two grated nutmegs, a spoonful of mingled cinnamon and mace, the grated rind of an orange or a lemon, a glass of brandy, a glass of wine, a teaspoonful of salt, and, finally, another pint of milk.

Stir, and stir faithfully, the whole mixture. This is where the family comes in. Everybody takes a turn stirring. If the mix is not thick enough, add more bread or flour – if it’s too thick, the pudding will be heavy and hard. Put the mixture in a greased pudding dish. Cover with a layer of waxed paper and a layer of aluminum foil, both with a fold in the middle to allow expansion of the pudding during steaming. Tie the paper and aluminum foil with kitchen string.

Boil for approximately six hours.

Have some blanched, sweet, almonds cut in slices, and some lemon rind sliced thinly. Decorate the outside of the pudding.

Serve with a sauce made of drawn butter, wine, and nutmeg.

Eat with wine.

Drawn butter is simple to make. Expand your puddings; we have some best pudding recipes.